Friday, July 16, 2010

Unemployed Should Consider Emigration

Let's face it, as far as the Federal government is concerned, jobs for Main Street is no different than jobs for Eskimoes. Our nation has been turning its back on significant segments of the population since its founding, and the newest career casualties will come from those who are seeking to make a living on Main Street instead of off Wall Street or Washington. Up to 35 million people across the US will experience personal unemployment during 2010. Yet, neither the Democrats nor Republicans have any real intentions of creating jobs directly, because both parties know they have no means of doing so.

The unemployment situation in Amercia will no doubt persist through the end of the decade and perhaps longer. Those unemployed who have exhausted their 99 weeks of unemployment checks should probably begin to evaluate emigration to other countries with their families in search of work. The irony is that as more and more unemployed leave the US, the unemployment burden will subside and prosperity for the remaining population with jobs will be accelerated. In the mean time, it's time for the unemployed to face the facts and reality that the nation cannot help them, but does nevertheless wish them the best...


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9 comments:

Anonymous said...

My youngest son just graduated with a BA - International Business degree. Rather than wait tables here in hopes of this all turning around, he has moved to China, where he is teaching english while taking mandarin classes. He is beginning to question whether he will ever work in the US. Jobs are everywhere in China. Sad, but at least he's being proactive.

Dr William J McKibbin said...

Dear Anonymous, I have lived and worked all over the world. I even owned and worked in my own business in Europe for over three years and was never happier (and I am still not sure why I returned to the US). I have lived and worked in Asia as a corporate trainer, and have an offer now to train executives in South Africa. Thinking globally is prudent today, especially given the confusion that is reigning across Main Street USA. I hope your son finds his way in his career and that everything works out for you and yours...

Bruce said...

I know 2 people in the last 12 months who have both moved to canada for jobs (good jobs, I might add)...Canada has nothing close to the unemployment problem we have here.

Tax Attorney said...

Uhmm... have you ever looked into how restrictive it is to emigrate to a developed country from the U.S. The United Kingdom, Sweden (where I wanted to emigrate to), the Netherlands, France, Germany, Spain, Italy--they simply won't allow Americans to come in and work there, unless they can prove that they have a certain amount of assets (generally $500K). Get you facts straight before you start advising people to emigrate. Oh, yes, you can go to China, but who would want to?

Dr William J McKibbin said...

Dear Tax Attorney, the places I had in mind were more like Africa, Latin America, and South America. Yes, the move would be hard. But for the unemployed with no income at all, life will be hard in the USA as well...

secondclass said...

After spending a few years overseas, a young person may want to move back to the U.S. The retirement of the baby boomers, who were educated in the 1960s when high school graduates had 12th grade, not 7th grade math and English skills and a BA meant a liberal education, not a semiliterate womans studies or Sarah Palin type education, will create tremendous opportunity for those with a 21st century education.

Anonymous said...

Good point--other places may be better to work, but what good is it if you can't get in? But for those of us approaching retirement, it's another matter. There are lots of places with very low cost of living, and pleasant conditions--in some ways, more pleasant than what you might be leaving behind. That option is looking better all the time.

Hidesato Sakakibara said...

I plan to be back in Japan permanently by February of 2011. I have been here in New York City for about 20 years and I see first-hand the decline of the United States. Yes, Japan has problems, but they are nothing compared to America's. I make frequent trips to Japan and each time I am amazed that low-level jobs abound (there are even free magazines placed all over for job applicants). In "sluggish" Japan, I often cannot get into a coffe house to buy a $5 cup of coffee because they are packed. A department store "sale" is usually 10% off (big deal!). Compare that to the 50% to 70% off in New York department stores, and even then people can't buy because they are afraid to spend as everyone is afraid of losing their jobs.

Your posts are 100% on the mark. If Americans really knew to what extant they were being lied to, and to how much trouble America was really in, there would be rioting in the streets. Again, thank you for your really great, accurate posts.

Dr William J McKibbin said...

Hi Hidesato, thanks for the comments and observations about America, and best of luck to you and yours...

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